latest Lenevo C940 14 laptop Machine

latest Lenevo C940 14 laptop Machine

The Lenovo C940 is a smaller 14” 2-in-1premium laptop, let’s check it out in this detailed review and help you decide if it’ssomething you should consider. For the specs my config has a 10th gen Inteli7-1065G7 quad core Ice Lake processor, just Intel Iris graphics here, 16gb of faster LPDDR4Xmemory in dual channel, there’s a 512gb NVMe M.2 SSD, and a 14” 1080p 60Hz touchscreen. For network connectivity it’s got WiFi 6and Bluetooth 5, however it’s too thin for ethernet, so you’ll need to use a dongleif you need that. The C940 specs can be customized when ordering,you can find examples and updated prices linked in the description. The laptop is made out of aluminium and it’savailable in two colours, I’ve got the iron grey version here and it looks clean and professional. For a thinner machine, the build quality feelsquite solid, there are no sharp corners or edges anywhere. Lenovo lists the weight as starting at 1.35kg,and mine was just a little more than this. With the small 65w power brick and cablesfor charging included, the total weight rises to 1.7kg The dimensions are on the slimmer side fora 14” laptop, coming in under 1.6cm thick. This allows it to have just 7mm thin screenbezels on the sides. Generally 2-in-1 touchscreen devices likethis have thinner bezels to help you avoid accidentally pressing the screen, but I foundthe bottom chin large enough to fulfil this role. I found it to work fine as a touch screen,and it apparently supports 10 finger gestures, so make sure you don’t have any more! There’s a pen included, it’s around theback on the right corner and charges while inserted into the machine. Due to its position I had great difficultytrying to pull it out with the laptop in front of me on a desk. It was much easier to pull it out once youflip it over into tablet mode, which to be fair is probably when you’re most likelyto want to use the pen, though I think it still would have been useful to have easyaccess in laptop mode too. I expected a nice satisfying magnetic clickor something when putting the pen back in, but that wasn’t the case, though it doesstay in place once you slide it back in place. The touch screen otherwise worked well forme, no issues to report. It’s got a glossy finish, and Lenovo saysthe 1080p version uses a 400 nit panel, while the 4K model is brighter at 500 nits. Using the Spyder 5, I found my 1080p modela bit under the 400 nit mark, but this can vary between panels, the contrast ratio wasabove average compared to most I’ve tested too. As for colour gamut, we’re looking at 95%of sRGB, 66% of NTSC, 71% of AdobeRGB, and 71% of DCI-P3, so alright results, plentyif you’re just using it for office work or ok for some content creation. The 4k 500 nit panel is HDR and supports 90%of DCI-P3, so definitely worth considering if you need better colours. There was no backlight bleed in my unit, anexcellent result, however this will vary between laptop and panel. Screen flex was very minor when intentionallytrying to move it due to the metal lid, however it highlighted that the laptop was easierto slide around than expected. The feet underneath didn’t really feel rubberyor sticky, it’s hard to describe but I guess it seems closer to a plastic so there maybe some slippage when pushed. The Yoga 360 degree hinge also contains thespeaker, so it basically faces you when in laptop mode, but still also faces out in tabletmode. The speakers sounded excellent, far aboveaverage and some of the best I’ve ever tested in a laptop, they were clear, there was somebass, and they were loud enough at maximum volume. The latencymon results looked alright too. The laptop can be opened up with one fingeruntil the screen gets to 90 degrees or so, then it starts to tip back, demonstratingthat in laptop mode there’s more weight towards the back, however it did sit fineon my lap. Despite the thinner bezels, the camera isfound above the display in the center, there’s no IR for Windows Hello but it’s got a physicallysliding privacy shutter. The camera looks pretty decent for 720p andsounds pretty average. Typing makes a kind of weird sound on thekeyboard. The keyboard has white backlighting whichilluminates all keys and secondary key functions. There’s no numpad in the 14” model, howeverthe larger 15” version does have that. I liked typing on the keyboard, the keys felta little clicky to press, here’s how typing sounds to give you an idea of what to expect. There are 2 levels of key brightness whichcan be adjusted by holding the function key and pressing the spacebar. Keyboard flex was on the lower side consideringhow thin it is, likely owing to that metal body. The precision touchpad clicks down anywherewhen pressed, I found it to work quite well without any problems and was happy that it’sbasically taking up as much space as it can. There’s a fingerprint scanner to the rightof the touchpad just below the keyboard, I found it to work fast and with good accuracy. Fingerprints and dirt didn’t show up veryeasily on my darker matte finish, but as a smooth surface it’s easy to clean with acloth. Like all glossy touch screens, fingerprintbuild up will occur over time unless you just stick to using the pen. On the left from the back there’s a USB3.1 Gen2 Type-A port, two Type-C Thunderbolt 3 ports with DisplayPort support, and eithercan be used to charge the device, followed by a 3.5mm audio combo jack. The right just has the power button towardsthe back, I pressed it a couple of times while picking it up before I got used to it whichputs it to sleep by default, but you can always change what the button does in Windows ifthis is an issue for you. The back has air exhaust holes, while thefront sticks out a little for you to get your finger in and open the lid. Underneath is pretty clean, with just someair intake vents towards the back. To get inside you need to take out 4 TR5 screws,then there are 3 more phillips head screws hidden underneath the back rubber foot, Ifound it a little tricky to open. Once inside we’ve got the battery takingup a large portion of space down the bottom, and the single M.2 slot for storage towardsthe right just above it. The WiFi chip is soldered to the board andso is the memory, so make sure you buy it with enough memory for what you need. We can also see the space that’s dedicatedto the pen. In addition to the speaker bar below the screen,there are a couple of speakers towards the front on the bottom. Despite the battery only being 60Wh, the C940definitely knows how to use it. I’ve tested it with the screen brightnessat 50%, background apps disabled and keyboard lighting off, and in my YouTube playback testit lasted for under 11 hours, putting it right at the top, though due to the lack of discretegraphics the regular gaming test was not possible. The Lenovo Vantage software lets you managethe system, you can change settings or update software and bios through here, though withthe C940 I didn’t see any option to change performance modes. I’ve tested thermals in a 21 degree Celsiusambient room temperature, at idle it was quite cool at 29 degrees Celsius. With the Aida64 CPU stress test running itdid initially spike above 80 degrees celsius, but before long it settled down in the mid60s with a slight improvement once undervolted with Throttlestop. Although clock speed peaked at 3.5GHz on all4 cores, around 2.7GHz was where things settled in at, and this is due to the lower wattageapplied to the processor, this is a 15 watt chip after all. It’s worth noting it was running up to 20watts or so closer to the start of the testing. When we look at 5 runs of Cinebench we cansee how the result slows down over time as these throttle limits get hit. As for the external temperatures where you’llactually be putting your hands, at idle it was in the low 20s, a very cool result. Even with the CPU stress test running it’sonly around 40 degrees, just a little warm to the touch owing to the metal chassis whichwill conduct heat, let’s have a listen to fan noise next. It was completely silent at idle, and theneven with the CPU stress test going as a worst case it wasn’t much louder at all. Next let’s find out how the C940 holds upin games, we’re not expecting much due to a lack of discrete graphics, so I’ll justtest the Intel Iris graphics at 720p with some basic titles to get an idea of what’spossible. Dota 2 runs on basically anything, so almost60 FPS was possible even at ultra settings, with much higher frame rates at low, whereeven the 1% low is higher than the screen’s 60Hz refresh rate. CS:GO was tested with the Ulletical FPS benchmark,and again around 60 FPS maxed out, though well over 100 FPS was possible at minimumsettings. Overwatch was tested in the practice range,at high settings and above it felt pretty stuttery and laggy, it wasn’t too bad atlow though, not great, but usable. I’ve used Adobe Premiere to export one ofmy laptop review videos at 4K. As the C940 doesn’t have discrete Nvidiaor Radeon graphics, it’s one of the slower results out of the laptops tested, howeverit is beating the Acer Swift 5 with the same processor which was in last place. I’ve used Crystal Disk Mark to test thestorage, and the 512GB NVMe M.2 drive was performing well, but expect different resultswith different storage options. For updated pricing check the links in thedescription, as prices will change over time. At the time of recording, in the US the C940is under $1100 USD though it is on sale. Here in Australia the starting price throughthe Lenovo website is $2700 AUD, it’s higher even after the currency conversion as thebase spec seems to be higher than the US config, which starts with an i5, but customizationscan be made when ordering. With all of that in mind let’s concludeby summarising the good and bad aspects of the Lenovo C940 2-in-1 laptop. Overall I thought the metal build qualitywas good, there was minimal screen and chassis flex when intentionally pushing down and Ipersonally liked the clean design. The keyboard has a nice and clicky feeling,the touchpad works well and is a good size despite it being a smaller 14” model, andthe speakers sounded excellent. The battery life was amazing, giving me oneof the best results out of all laptops I’ve tested in the YouTube playback test. The C940 has Type-C charging too, along withThunderbolt support, and the power brick is on the smaller size, making the whole packagefairly portable. The 1080p touchscreen had basically no bleed,decent brightness and colour gamut, but consider getting the 4K model if you need better coloursand brightness for tasks like content creation. Even when under heavy load the C940 ran onthe cooler side and didn’t get loud at all compared to most others I’ve tested. Very light gaming is possible with the IntelIris graphics at 720p, but don’t expect much. The lack of discrete GPU will also slow downother tasks like video editing, but for other general tasks that don’t need GPU accelerationI found it to perform well, beating out the Acer Swift 5 with same processor in my Premiereexport test. As for things I didn’t like, it could bea bit slippery when on a desk if you push it lightly due to the lack of sticky rubberfeet. The pen was challenging to remove with thelaptop in laptop mode, though this was much easier once you fold it into tablet mode. The price doesn’t seem too bad for a thinnerand lighter machine, but that’s definitely what you’re paying for here, as you canof course get more powerful specs in a larger machine for less money, it just depends whatyour priorities are. I could recommend the C940 for someone thatneeds portability with a long battery life and isn’t looking for a gaming or hardcorevideo editing laptop, something for say office use or travel, once that’s allowed again,would be perfect use cases for it. Let me know what you thought about the LenovoC940 2-in-1 laptop down in the comments, and if you’re new to the channel get subscribedfor future laptop reviews and tech videos like this one.

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